Confirmed: The EM1 II is the best M43 camera

Olympus OM-D EM1 : Worth every penny?

At last cameralabs has completed its in-depth review of the M43 powerhouse which is the Olympus OM-D EM1 II and the article makes a fasinating read.

Basically tye review confirms what every other review has concluded bar none, that the EM1 II is a true and proper powerhouse camera, a genuine high performing “Pro” focussed model that on many levels can and does compete with its bigger APS-C equipped rivals.

Am getting one its just a question when.

Quick Overview of the Olympus OM-D EM1 II

The Olympus OM- EM1 II is the new high -end flagship Micro Four Third ( M43) camera body from Olympus.

The camera is equipped with a brand new 20 Megapixel Live MOS sensor that also has 121-point embedded phase-detect AF points which cover a larger area of the frame than the previous EM1. The phase-detect points are all the sensitive cross-type that work and work alongside a contrast-based system for both Single and Continuous AF. The new beefed up AF system works for Micro as well as older Four Thirds lenses plus Panasonic lenses are supported.

The in-body stabilisation system has been improved to offer a claimed 5.5 stops of compensation or a scarsely believeable 6 to 6,5 stop stabilisation with lenses that support Sync IS (presently only M.Zuiko 300mm telephoto and the new 12-100mm f4 IS PRO zoom)

Impressively the EM1 Mark II will shoot at its full resolution (including RAW) up to 18fps with continuous AF or 60fps with single AF, and deploys a dedicated quad-core processor to AF duties.

The viewfinder still uses an LCD ( as opposed to OLED) and is the same size and resolution as the one in the EM1, but now features a faster 120fps refresh and 6ms response, while the touch-screen has become side-hinged and fully-articulated.

For video joining 1080 video there is 4k UHD and Cinema4k recording at 102 and 237Mbps respectively.

Finally there’s now dual SD memory card slots, a higher capacity battery with quicker charging, and the rugged better sculptured body remains dust, splash and freeze-proof.

All in all one hell of a spec list.

Review From Cameralabs

“Good points
Best-in-class built-in stabilisation for stills and movies.
Tough weather-proof body with twin card slots and great ergonomics.
Effective continuous AF up to 18fps (electronic) or 10fps (mechanical).
High speed bursts up to 60fps, including full-res RAW (48 frames at top speed).
Very good JPEGs from camera; come close to 24MP APSC in resolving power.
Large battery for mirrorless, and quick charging too.
Great quality 4k UHD and C4k video. Flat profile option.
High Res mode generates images up to 50MP under ideal conditions.
Pro Capture mode buffers up to 14 frames prior to shutter press”.

“Bad points
No indication of shots remaining in buffer during burst shooting.
Can’t playback images while buffer is emptying (but can still shoot).
Auto ISO not available above 6400 ISO nor in Movie manual mode.
Autofocus during movies can be hesitant and inconsistent.
Timelapse movies at low frame rates when encoded in 1080p or 4k.
Articulated screen can interfere with mic, headphone and HDMI ports.
No battery charging in-camera over USB.
Sensor output not as clean as larger formats above 6400 ISO in my tests”.

From Cameralabs: Olympus OMD EM1 Mark II final verdict

“The Olympus OMD EM1 Mark II takes the popular weatherproof Mark I, deepens the grip, adds twin memory card slots and employs the most generous battery of any mirrorless camera. It improves the already amazing stabilisation, adds a minor boost in resolution and offers a cunning composite mode which under the right conditions can increase the resolving power up to 50 Megapixels.

The major upgrades though concern video and autofocus. The EM1 Mark II shots great quality 4k and Cinema4k video which work a treat with the stabilisation, while a new embedded AF system can genuinely track moving action at up to 18fps; switch to Single AF and it’ll even shoot up to 48 RAWs at 60fps. It all adds up to a supremely confident and capable camera that can capture images where others can’t, but you’ll really have to need the 4k and or burst capabilities to justify the professional price tag. There’s a lot of very compelling rivals for the same or less money. But if you’ll exploit the feature-set, the EM1 Mark II becomes one of the most powerful and desirable cameras in its class and justifies its asking price regardless of format”.

My Take:

There is VERY little realistically that Olympus could have done to improve on the EM1 II bar maybe a more resolute viewfinder (Like the one in the new Panasonic GH4) and allowing in-camera USB charging?

Image quality is as close to the very best APS-C cameras as to make no real world difference so long as you keep to sub ISO 1600 and even so higher ISO settings are still perfectly useable.

True the EM1 II isn’t cheap but the sort of performance and technolgy it packs was always going to come at a cost.

If your a current M43 user and seek the best take a long hard look at the Olympus OM-D EM1 II

January 2017

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *