Fuji gives full details of the Fujifilm GFX 50S

Full details of Fujifilm GFX 50S Announced

Fujfilm GFX 50S : Sub £7 Grand medium format ownership

News image

Fuji has released full details of it up and coming mirrorless medium-format camera, the Fujifilm GFX 50S which may look  a bit like a pumped up X-T2 but in reality will gives users out of this world image quality.

The realitively compact size and weight of the GFX 50S suggests handheld medium format photography will become a whole lot more pratical.

As previously reported the new Fujifilm GFX 50S will use a 51.4MP ‘Fujifilm G Format’ medium-format sensor (which measures 43.8 x 32.9mm), and which offers an area that is some 1.7x larger than that of a normal full-frame sensor.

The lens mount will be known as G-mount and, like all medium-format cameras, it has a ‘reverse’ crop factor of 0.79x, so that new 63mm F2.8 lens is actually equivalent to 50mm.

Fujifilm promises six “G” lenses in 2017, the standard 63mm f2.8 prime (50mm equivalent) and 36-64mm f4 zoom (25-51mm equiv) at launch  followed by the 120mm f4 OIS Macro by mid 2017, then the 45mm f2.8 (35mm equiv), 110mm f2 (87mm equiv) and 23mm f4 (18mm equiv) by the end of the year. All are weather-sealed and employ fly-by-wire electronic focusing like X-mount lenses. Fujifilm also claims they are designed to deliver sufficient resolution for 100 Megapixel sensors in the future.

The camera new camera has a 117-point contrast-detect AF system, and users can set the focus point using the touchscreen or a joystick on the rear plate. Its NP-T125 lithium-ion battery is rated for 400 shots on a single charge.

The weather-sealed body is made of a magnesium alloy and weighs just 825g/43oz with battery and memory card installed a lot less than other medium format cameras.

It has a large 3.2″ dual-tilt touchscreen LCD display plus a 2.36M-dot OLED viewfinder, to which you can add a ’tilt adapter’ allowing it to tilt upward by 90° and rotated left or right by 45°.

On the top plate you will find a small 1.28″ LCD which displays current shooting settings. There are two SD card slots, both of which support high-speed UHS-II media.

It can even capture Full HD video at up to 30p, with a bit rate of 36 Mbps and as usual for medium format cameras it will supports tethered shooting from a PC.

Various optional accessories will be available including a battery grip, H-Mount adapter for use with classic Fujinon HC lenses and a ‘View Camera Adapter G’ that lets you use the GFX as a digital back.

And finally the important bits.

The new camera (and first “G” lenses) will become available at the end of February with the new Fujifilm GFX 50S costing £6199 body only which is a bit of a bargin in the medium formatt world but regrettably means it will be out of the reach of us mere mortals.

January 2017

New 50mm f2 “XF” weather sealed lens by Fuji

Fujinon XF 50mm f2  R WR Announced

Fujifilm has announced a new weather-resistant prime: the Fujinon XF 50mm F2 R WR. The new lens joins the XF 35mm F2 and 23mm F2 as another compact, lightweight yet sturdy lens for the X-system. Offering dust and water resistance, the 50mm F2 is freezeproof to 14°F/-10°C.

On Fujifilm’s APS-C “X” cameras (ie the X-Pro 1-2 / T-T1-2, X-T10-2 & XE2) the 50mm F2 lens will offer a 76mm equivalent view and will be available in black and silver. The lens comprises 9 elements in 7 groups with one aspherical ED element, and uses a stepping motor for autofocus.

January 2015

Fujifilm XT-20: A Bargin mini X-T2

Fujifilm X-T20 : A bargin mini X-T2?

Fuji have announced the new XT-20 to replace the X-T10 and what’s really good news is that save for a couple of features (ie dual SD slots, no battery grip capacity, slightly smaller less resolute rear screen, non fully articulated screen, slightly downgraded video features) the X-T20- is really a smaller X-T2, honestly.

Kit and caboodle

The most significant similarity between the X-T20 and its bigger more expensive brother is the move to a 24MP sensor. This chip is a proven performer and worth an upgrade on its own.

The X-T20 gains the same processor as the X-T2 which means autofocus speeds, shutter lag time, shot-to-shot time and startup delay are all going to be rapid.

The X-T20 gains its autofocus system direct & wholesale from the X-T2, not only providing direct access to up to 325 selectable AF points (up from the X-T10’s 49), but also gaining the sophisticated continuous AF fine-tuning.

Bottom line. If you want to join the “X” family and was considering the X-T2 I’d take a long hard look at the new X-T20. You could get the body of the X-T20 kitted with the  quality standard zoom, the 18-55mm f2.8-4 for around the same price of a X-T2 body only, thats a non brainer for many people unless there is a specific feature you seek from  X-T2

The new Fujifilm X-T20 cold be a very shrewd move by Fuji.

January 2017

Fujifilm X100F breaks cover

We knew it was coming but today (19th January) Fuji has officially announced the latest version of its rangefinder styled  “X” camera the Fujifilm X100F.

The updates over the previous X100T are evolutionary and subtle but nonetheless useful and welcomed.

Fujifilm X100F : Best X100 Model Yet

Key Features / Updates over X100F

(1) Now uses the 24mp Trans-X sensor as found in the XT2 and X-Pro 2

(2)  Number of autofocus points increase from 49 to 91

(3) The Camera gains an AF toggle on the rear

(4) Top shutter dial modified to now include ISO setting

(5) Rear buttons move to the right of the body

(6) New battery with promised improved battery life

(7) Acros effect has been added to film simulation

And that’s about it.

The new camera is ever so slightly bigger than the X100T but for a camera so clearly aimed as a top-end street camera offering a 35mm equivilent fixed focal lenght it still lacks weather sealing and the rear screen is not only fixed but also has no touch capacity?????

And for me the omission of those two features is a bit of a strange decision for a camera that will cost close to £1300.

Current X100 owners will be delighted, an upgrade purely because of the new sensor would be justified but I can’t help thinking Fuji have slightly short changed their loyal customers.

Along with the camera itself Fuji have updated the WCL-X100 wide-angle and TCL-X100 tele-conversion lenses  ‘Mark II’ versions and will now offer electronic contacts so that the camera will automatically recognize the conversion lenses when they’re attached and apply distortion correction.

Shown with optional 1.4x teleconverter

 

Shown with optional 28mm wide-angle converter

January 2017

Panasonic Lumix FZ200 : A mini GH4?

Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 : Geared more towards video than stills

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2000 Review Image

Online review site has completed a detailed review of Panasonic’s new high-end bridge / superzoom the Panasonic FZ2000 and their conclusions and test results are food for thought for the new camera appears to be definately aimed more towards video than still capture.

FZ2000 at a glance

  • 20MP 1″-type BSI-CMOS sensor
  • 24-480mm equiv. F2.8-4.5 lens
  • Depth from Defocus AF
  • Large 2.36M dot electronic viewfinder
  • Fully articulating 3″ 1.04M dot Touch LCD screen
  • Built-in variable ND filter
  • 4K video capture (DCI/UHD)
  • 10-bit, 4:2:2 output over HDMI

Heres a snippet of DPreviews conclusions:

Pro’s

  • Good image quality, especially in Raw
  • Very well-built body with large grip
  • Impressive continuous AF and subject tracking performance
  • Internal zoom lens allows for smooth and quiet focusing
  • Excellent 4K video quality
  • Numerous video capture controls
  • Built-in variable ND filter
  • Large electronic viewfinder
  • Numerous customizable controls, both physical and on-screen
  • Well-implemented touch functionality
  • Support for V-Log L gamma
  • 10-bit 4:2:2 output over HDMI
  • Handy Focus Stacking and Post Focus features
  • External battery charger included

Con’s

  • Image quality hampered by mediocre lens
  • Heavy noise reduction in JPEGs
  • Yellows have greenish tint which affects skin tones
  • Substantial 1.4x crop in 4K eliminates wide-angle capability and affects low light performance
  • Basic Auto ISO functionality
  • On the bulky side
  • LCD cannot fully rotate when left-side I/O ports are in use
  • Battery life could be better
  • No support for USB charging
Conclusion
“The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500/FZ2000 is a well-designed enthusiast bridge camera focused on video, and it offers capture tools that you won’t find on any other camera in its class. 4K video quality is excellent, though there’s a substantial crop factor, essentially knocking out the wide end of the lens. Still image quality is decent, though it’s hampered by a so-so lens and JPEG engine that could use a tune-up. If you’re a videophile then it’s a top choice. If not, there are cheaper options out there”.
My Take:
Once again a review site has concluded that the FZ2000’s lens cannot compete with the one found in Sony’s expensive rival the RX10 III. This show just what an excellent job Sony has done with the optic in its top-end superzoom.
Up until reading Dprveiews review I’d have chosen the FZ2000 as my prefered bridge / superzoom but now am not so sure.
And that’s the stark choice potential buyers of a high-end superzoom face.
If you want the best superzoom / bridge camera on the market its the Sony RX10 III period , it offers superior image quality over its rivals but you’ll pay for that class.
However if video is your thing the Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 is the way to go.
But if value for money is your thing then as Dpreview has correctly pointed out the Panasonic Lumix FZ1000 is still available and its lens is optically superior to the newer FZ model, plus its now a fair bit cheaper.
So on the face of it you either wait a little longer save the pennies and get the Sony RX10 III or get the bargin that is the Panasonic FZ1000.
This leaves the FZ2000 a bit stuck in the middle until you consider that in many ways, video feature wise its a bit of a mini GH4?
Mark Baynham ( January 2017)